Tag: colebrooke

Colebrooke Revel

COLEBROOKE REVEL About 200 years ago the people of Colebrooke would be getting ready for their annual festivities. However, The Colebrooke Revel seems to have been taking place long before this and originally began with a church service on the morning of the Sunday nearest the 7th of July followed by a day of sporting activities. In 1896 a paper read to the Devonshire Association regarding the revels of Devon over the previous 100 years mentioned Colebrooke and said it had become noteworthy for its “Revel Buns” Read more...

The Great Fire of Colebrooke

The Great Fire of Colebrooke At the western side of the churchyard, by the road leading up to the village hall, three rows of graves cover the area once occupied by a row of thatch cottages. On the afternoon of 24th August 1893 these cottages, including the grocer’s shop, were destroyed in one of the most massive conflagrations in Colebrooke. The alarm was raised by the schoolmaster Mr John Sharland who from his house beside the school (Chenery House) could see smoke rising at the back of one of the cottages occupied by retired farmer Mr John Cooper. Read more...

Colebrooke Bellringers Bell Ringing Marathon

On 9th March 1991 at 5.00 pm six bellringers and two peal callers gathered at St. Andrews Church Colebrooke to ring a peal of call changes on Colebrooke’s enormous and tricky 18cwt peal of bells that consisted of 1507 call changes where different pairs of bells exchange places in a sequence of six. The occasion was to raise money for the refurbishment of Colebrooke’s bells. Much needed refreshments were laid on by volunteers at the village hall afterwards. Read more...

Gregorys of Colebrooke

The Gregorys of Colebrooke (and beyond) Brownsland/Broomsland Home of The Gregorys in 1860 Brownsland Colebrooke was formerly a farm of about 70 acres lying below what is now Sheppark Farm. The name Sheppark referred to the field Sheep Park which used to stretch from Brownsland farmhouse down to the railway line with other smaller fields, no longer in existence, surrounding the farmstead. (Early records referred to the farm as Brownsland but from the Colebrooke estate sale of 1919 it became known as Broomsland. Read more...